Introduction

Traditional Islamic logic studies the rules of correct mental inference. Muslim scholars received Aristotelian logic as early as the second Islamic century, improved it, and tailored it to the needs of the Islamic sciences, turning it into a thoroughly Islamic discipline. An introductory study of logic is now indispensable for any serious study of the Islamic sciences. Take this course to understand what the science of logic is, where it came from, how Muslim scholars use it in the Islamic sciences, and how it relates to the methods of reasoning in modern science and modern formal logic.

Curricular Context

  • This is a first-level course in Step Two
  • Complete Step One before taking this course

Course Outline

WEEK 1

  • (1) Is Logic Permissible? (in 3 parts)
  • (2) Why Do We Need Logic?
  • (3) Why Should We Do Inference?

WEEK 2

  • (4) Introduction to Abhari’s Isagoge
  • (5) Does Logic Need Language?
  • (6) How Exactly Does Logic Use Language? (in 2 parts)

WEEK 3

  • (7) What are Universals?
  • (8) Why are Universal Concepts Important?
  • (9) The Five Universals

WEEK 4

  • (10) Essences
  • (11) Definition

WEEK 5

  • (12) Propositions
  • (13) What Does it Mean for a Proposition to be True?

WEEK 6

  • (14) Kinds of Categorical Propositions
  • (15) Kinds of Conditional Propositions

WEEK 7

  • (16) Contradiction
  • (17) Conversion

WEEK 8

  • (18) What is an Argument?

WEEK 9

  • (19) Deductive Inference with Categorical Syllogisms

WEEK 10

  • (20) Deductive Inference with Conditional Syllogisms

WEEK 11

  • (21) The Matter of Conclusive Arguments
  • (22) The Matter Probabilistic Arguments

WEEK 12

  • (23) Has Modern Science Replaced Ancient Logic?
  • (24) Has Modern Logic Replaced Ancient Logic?

FINAL LIVE SESSION

  • (25) Where Do I Go From Here?

What You Will Learn:

  • Explain what Islamic logic is, how it developed, and why it needs to be studied
  • Memorize the definitions of key terms in the science of Islamic logic
  • Apply the techniques of Islamic logic to a variety of problems in the Islamic sciences
  • Explain the relevance of Islamic logic today


Course Requirements:
Complete Step One before taking this course

 

Course Format: 12 downloadable lessons. 3 live sessions.

About the Course Text

This course is a contemporary explanation of

al-Isaghuji, a primer on Islamic logic by Athir al-Din al-Abhari (d. 663 A.H. / 1265 C.E.). al-Abhari is famous as an astronomer, scientist, and philosopher, but he was also a scholar of Islamic theology (kalam), sacred law (fiqh), and sacred legal theory (usul al-fiqh). His primer on logic is his most famous work, studied in religious seminaries all over the Islamic world ever since it was written all the way down to the present day. Although it has the same name as the Isagoge of the Neoplatonist pagan philosopher Porphyry (d. 269 C.E.) (a work that was studied widely in medieval Christian circles), Abhari’s work is distinctly Islamic with distinctly Islamic concerns. This course unpacks Abhari’s al-Isaghuji in light of how it has been used for centuries by scholars of the traditional Islamic sciences, and also in light of contemporary scientific and philosophical debates, leaving students with a clear understanding of what it meant to be a thinking and well-educated Muslim in the past, and what it means to be a thinking and well-educated Muslim today. A translation of the course text is provided as part of the course materials.

Please share this with your family and friends:

“Whoever guides someone to goodness will have a similar reward”– The Prophet (Peace and Blessings Be Upon Him)